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Request Legal Advice

Consider All Your Options

Anonymous Employee strongly recommends examining all the available options before beginning a law suit. Litigation is expensive, and lets face it, you don't always win.

If you would like assistance understanding the available options, please do not hesitate to contact us. Please note that Anonymous Employee cannot provide you with legal advice.

 

Generally Suggested Steps of Action
At Anonymous Employee, we realize that no two situations are completely alike. As a result, the following steps are suggested as a guideline only. This is not legal advice, and should not be considered legal advice.
Document Your Problem
 

Your problem may be very simple, or extremely complex. In either case it is a valuable exercise to document your problem from beginning to end. This helps you in many ways:
1. You are able to help identify the causes of the problem.
2. You have a written record that will be required at almost every step in the process of seeking assistance.
3. You can continue to update your record of events as they occur. This helps you to specify dates, times, and events.

Research Your Problem
  Empower yourself with full knowledge of the problem, and the laws in your area. Knowledge is power. Employment laws can vary greatly depending on the location of your company and the more information you have in the beginning stages, the better you will be able to keep control of the situation. For some places to look, click here.
Identify Multiple Solutions
  Talk to friends and family who's values and judgements you can trust. Brainstorm possible solutions with trusted friends and family. It may not be a good idea to share your problems with work friends. Through your documentation and research, a number of solutions will likely present themselves. Many options are less risky and less costly than litigation.
Select an Approach
  Based on your findings, choose a method of moving further. Normally, it is suggested to exhaust all of your internal options before moving to external ones. This can include: talk to an individual you have a problem with, speak with your Human Resources Department, speak with your Union Representative, use the Anonymous Employee communication process, request mediation assistance, report the problem to superiors, or get in touch with an employment lawyer.
Document the Results
  When you decide on a course of action, or multiple courses of action, be sure to continue to document your decisions and the results. Be sure to include dates and times.